Available courses

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The Bullets Marching Band performs at all home football games and various other functions throughout the fall semester. Participation is open to any Gettysburg College student who plays a wind or percussion instrument, as well as to visual performers in Color Guard (Flag/Rifle/Saber). Four hours of rehearsal weekly. Graded A-F. Offered each fall. 0.25 course credit. Four semesters of participation earn MI: Arts credit

Bullets Marching BandThe Bullets Marching Band performs at all home football games and various other functions throughout the fall semester. Participation is open to any Gettysburg College student who plays a wind or percussion instrument, as well as to visual performers in Color Guard (Flag/Rifle/Saber). Four hours of rehearsal weekly. Graded A-F. Offered each fall. 0.25 course credit. Four semesters of participation earn MI: Arts credit

Most of our lives we are taught to avoid failure. However, many of the world’s most successful people have failed repeatedly on their paths towards success. Using the equipment, tools, and materials in the Innovation and Creativity Lab we will experiment with failure as a strategy for learning and a catalyst for creative problem solving. Through engaging discussions, hands on design thinking projects, and perplexing activities this course will challenge your preconceived notions of what it means to fail and how to successfully embrace failure in your future endeavors.

The Bullets Marching Band performs at all home football games and various other functions throughout the fall semester. Participation is open to any Gettysburg College student who plays a wind or percussion instrument, as well as to visual performers in Color Guard (Flag/Rifle/Saber). Four hours of rehearsal weekly. Graded A-F. Offered each fall. 0.25 course credit. Four semesters of participation earn MI: Arts credit

London was at the center of the European Theater of conflict in World War II for six years, from 1939 to 1945. The British capital came perilously close to invasion in the late summer of 1940, was severely bombed by the German Air Force (the Luftwaffe), and was a target of missile and rocket attacks in 1944 and 1945. During this time Prime Minister Winston Churchill led the city, and his country and empire, with unparalleled leadership. He rallied the nation to stand alone against Hitler, inspired spirited resistance, and worked with the Americans and other Allied countries to defeat the Nazi tyranny. The aftermath of the war saw tremendous social and economic change in Britain with the meaning of the war likened to greater equality. Effects of the war are still visible in the material and commemorative culture of London — buildings still carry scars from bomb damage, and statuary honors the experience. Our seminar will examine these aspects of the war, using the city of London itself as our primary text.